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CNN.com - Fighting Cancer and Inaction

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  • CNN.com - Fighting Cancer and Inaction

    Some emails from survivors in response to the Armstrong commentary. At least 1 familiar name in the article

    CNN.com readers shared powerful stories of sickness and survival in response to a commentary written by Lance Armstrong, one of cycling's all-time greats and possibly the world's best known cancer survivor.
    _____________________________________________

    Left I/O 5/7/05, Stage 1(pT1)
    No VI or LI, Normal Markers
    70% Embryonal, 30% Seminoma
    Surveillance
    1st child born on 8/08

  • #2
    Just read it

    I just got done reading it, and the same thing popped to my head. Congrats Scott, you made it on CNN.
    Diagnosed 7/5/05, Rt. I/O 7/29/05, Nonseminoma Stage IIa, Started 3XBEP 9/06/05 changed to 4XEP due to reaction from Bleomycin. Currently surveillance.

    Comment


    • #3
      I was thinking, "Wait a minute, where have I heard of a Scott from NH..."
      It was definitely a worthwhile reading break while processing lab data. Congrats!
      "Life moves pretty fast; if you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it." -Ferris Bueller
      11.22.06 -Dx the day before Thanksgiving
      12.09.06 -Rt I/O; 100% seminoma, multifocal; Stage I-A; Surveillance; Six years out! I consider myself cured.

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      • #4
        By Lance Armstrong
        Special to CNN

        Lance Armstrong, one of cycling's all-time greats and possibly the world's best known cancer survivor, founded the Lance Armstrong Foundation with the goal of inspiring and empowering people with cancer. He now campaigns for more government funds for cancer research and treatment.

        AUSTIN, Texas (CNN) -- I'm not known for my patience. Patience is a polite quality and often appropriate, but it rarely gets things done. Impatience, however, is the hunger for results and intolerance for excuses and delays. Impatience got me over countless mountain passes, across the finish line in New York City and through four rounds of ruthless chemotherapy 10 years ago.

        Yet this election season I patiently waited to hear a candidate for office explain to constituents what he or she planned to do about one of the leading threats to the health and well-being of all Americans -- cancer. My patience was greeted with silence.

        Cancer will impact one in two men and one in three women in their lifetime. It is devastating and it is pervasive. In fact, every year 1.3 million Americans are diagnosed with cancer.

        Thankfully, our country has made tremendous progress in this fight and produced remarkable advances in the way we prevent, diagnose and treat cancer. Today, in many cases, we can humbly say that cancer is no longer a death sentence. The medical advances achieved by our nation's best doctors and researchers have given us reasons to hope.

        But in spite of this vast body of knowledge, 1,500 people will die from cancer today and tomorrow and the day after that, often because the care they needed to prevent cancer or survive it was not available to them.

        However, our nation's second-leading killer did not make the list of issues that our candidates used to get people to the polls last November. Anyone with a television or access to a newspaper can list the ballot box issues that occupied our candidates' attention -- they range from bickering to very real concerns and challenges.

        The political ads didn't tell voters that earlier in the year funding for cancer research was cut for the first time in 30 years. Nor did they explain that a lack of funding slows the pace of scientific discovery and the development of treatments. Our candidates did not mention the decrease in funding for programs that provide information and screening to people who need these services. I think this is unwise, but it is what our government has done this past year. I waited patiently for an explanation, some clarification or justification. Ten million cancer survivors deserve an answer. We didn't get one.

        It is true that state and federal budgets are constrained by many important responsibilities. But cancer doesn't care about that.

        It is time to hold our leaders accountable. It remains to be seen if the change in power on Capitol Hill will affect the fight against cancer. In two years we will elect a new president. We cannot predict the actions of any of our elected officials, but we can say for sure that when it comes to cancer their silence is unacceptable.

        Patient people may accept the status quo, but the status quo isn't working for us. Instead, we need to stubbornly hold our leaders accountable and we need the courage to ask tough questions of our elected officials. Few issues facing our government are more personal or more critical than the health of our citizens. What are we going to do to effectively fight cancer? Millions of Americans with cancer are asking.

        I'm not known for my patience. When it comes to cancer, I hope you aren't either.

        The opinions expressed in this commentary are those of the writer. This is part of an occasional series of commentaries on CNN.com that offers a broad range of perspectives, thoughts and points of view.
        James,
        Stage IIIa Seminoma
        4x BEP Completed 2/14/05
        [email protected]

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        • #5
          If you haven't seen "Saving Your Life" yet, it will be broadcast on CNN again at 8:00 and 11:00 p.m. Eastern time tonight (Sunday, 1/14/2007).
          Scott, [email protected]
          right inguinal orchiectomy 6/5/2003 > nonseminoma, stage I > surveillance > L-RPLND 6/24/2005 for recurrence, suspected teratoma but found seminoma, stage II > chylous ascites until 9/2005 > surveillance and "all clear" since


          Your donation funds Livestrong services for people facing cancer now. Please sponsor my ride!

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          • #6
            Lance / CNN

            Saw it last night Scott. Everyone should watch it if they have a chance. Got to get this country on the right track. It's sinful to think $$ for cancer research was cut back. Something wrong with this picture for sure. Lance is such an inspiration and an amazing advocate for the cause.

            Kathy

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            • #7
              In addition to some familiar themes, I picked up a few from this broadcast that I haven't heard as frequently.
              1. It's not just about "the big breakthrough." We can save many, many lives just by using what we already know and providing access to early diagnosis and treatment to all.
              2. Drug companies need incentives to discover and produce medicines that help small populations. Many such treatments will probably never be profitable, especially as we understand better how to tailor treatment to individuals.
              3. Research to understand metastasis accounts for only 1% of funding, yet it's metastasis that is deadliest.
              Scott, [email protected]
              right inguinal orchiectomy 6/5/2003 > nonseminoma, stage I > surveillance > L-RPLND 6/24/2005 for recurrence, suspected teratoma but found seminoma, stage II > chylous ascites until 9/2005 > surveillance and "all clear" since


              Your donation funds Livestrong services for people facing cancer now. Please sponsor my ride!

              Comment

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