Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Checking In

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Checking In

    Hello Everyone and Happy 4th of July to US based fellow TC'ers!

    I just wanted to note that my two year anniversary post chemo is coming up and so far so good. AFP in normal range with very little fluctuation within normal, clean chest xrays and blood pressure is coming down a bit.

    I am curious about the following topics and would appreciate anyone's cites or opinions:

    1. Within the US, is TC more prevalent in one city, state or area of the country?

    2. I have read that post chemo, maintaining normal blood pressure levels can be challenging? Is that true and is there good research available on this topic and potentially mitigating the problem?

    3. For those of you going through or having gone through chemo, surgery, numerous MD visits - do you think it would be more or less (or same) difficult to be a care giver to a significant other vs. going through this mess? I think about my wife often and how well she coped and provided assistance calmly and with thoughts collected in an organized manner. Never snapped back at me when I was difficult during steriod time or whatever. I don't know if I could have been half as effective in that role. Conversely, maybe you just react and do what you need to do - naturally.

    I wish everyone the very best and looking forward to the Philly Livestrong event. Scott - I am trying to arrange my schedule to either help or donate.
    Jim
    ------------------------
    Left I/O 4/21/05
    Stage IIA, Non Seminoma, 100% Embryonal
    BEP X3 - 07/11/2005 - 9/6/2005
    Surveillance - Negative CT, CXR & Markers
    I love my life!

  • #2
    Hey Jim,
    It's great to hear that you are near the two-year mark. I'll take a stab at a couple of questions I might be able to answer.
    Originally posted by Bagpipe
    1. Within the US, is TC more prevalent in one city, state or area of the country?
    Hard to say, but you may be able to get statistical data on this from the American Cancer Society website. The LAF website has links to statistical data on cancer incidence by state. If you are interested in this info on the urban/city level, then the state's corresponding Department of Public Health or other similar entity may have that information.
    Originally posted by Bagpipe
    3. For those of you going through or having gone through chemo, surgery, numerous MD visits - do you think it would be more or less (or same) difficult to be a care giver to a significant other vs. going through this mess? I think about my wife often and how well she coped and provided assistance calmly and with thoughts collected in an organized manner. Never snapped back at me when I was difficult during steriod time or whatever. I don't know if I could have been half as effective in that role. Conversely, maybe you just react and do what you need to do - naturally.
    The reactions are clearly going to be different, and a whole bunch of circumstances play a role here. I have been fortunate enough to escape thus far with an I/O alone, but even that caused a little bit of hardship. All the turmoil happened during the holidays with a hyperactive 1 1/2 year old kid running around. My folks were in town during surgery time, and having my Mom around to help out was huge; but once she left, all the burden of chores and the kid shifted to my wife. It was quite obvious that she had a lot of pent-up stress, and I personally was frustrated that I could do very little to help out (especially doing my usual chores that required lifting... taking out the trash, bringing the laundry downstairs, carrying the kid and putting her to bed...). To this day, I'm not sure how well she coped with it or whether there is some resentment there. My biggest fear was that I have no idea how she would react if, God forbid, I relapsed (I really doubt that will happen, but I have to acknowledge the possibility that I could).
    As far as switching the roles of caregiver and patient, an obvious example that comes to mind is a pregnancy. While she was expecting our kid, I did pretty much everything to make it easy on her. Granted, she didn't have a disease per se, but I had to do all the work: drive her around, clean the litter box, do the groceries, clean the house, cook her meals. I just did it out of instinct. She was carrying our child, so I had a vested interested in both their welfare. My feeling is that it would go both ways.
    OK, I think I've rambled enough. Hope this helps out. Have a great Fourth!
    "Life moves pretty fast; if you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it." -Ferris Bueller
    11.22.06 -Dx the day before Thanksgiving
    12.09.06 -Rt I/O; 100% seminoma, multifocal; Stage I-A; Surveillance; Six years out! I consider myself cured.

    Comment


    • #3
      Hi Jim....happy 4th of July and also great news about your 2 year mark...should I do the dance? Okay I will...'happy dancing'

      Great questions...I have too often wondered about the location in regards to cancer. I have seen 'pockets' of cancer where it feels like many people from one area seem to have it. But it could just be by chance. I know I have mentioned it before but I often find it strange the TC is so rare, yet my husband and his childhood friend, who lived right next to each other, got it.

      Your second question about post chemo....the answer, according to what I know, is yes. Post chemo you will have higher risk for high blood pressure and people that have chemo also have more weight gain later in life. I am not sure what the science is to support this...but we have been told by several doctors (including the amazing docs at SK) that these are things we have to watch for. The funny thing is, I always assumed people getting chemo lost weight. My husband did not loose weight at all and only started dropping pounds due to the RPLND. That RPLND is like Weight Watchers on steroids.

      Your third question is more difficult for me to answer because I was the caregiver. I can tell you my husband says daily, 'Thank God you were not sick because this place would have fallen apart and I would not have done well having to take care of someone'...but I am sure if I had of gotten sick, he would have done just fine. I am lucky that I am one of those people who really enjoy caring for others..so the role...not the event mind you...fit me like a glove. The event was horrible and I think I am still shaken by it.

      M
      Co-survivor with husband Boyce, Diagnosed 7-11-06, orchiectomy right testicle on 7-12-06- Stage 3A: Mixed germ cell tumor with inguinal seminomatous and kartotypic carcinoma. One tumor over 10 cm, second tumor 4 cm, Chemo 4xBEP: Bi-lateral RPLND Dec 2006, nerve sparing but left sterile.
      Current DVT
      Current testosterone replacement therapy, Testim.

      "You must abandon the life you planned, to live the life that was meant for you" ~wisdom I have learned from my family on this forum

      Comment


      • #4
        get jiggy wid it margaret!

        Margaret...

        I have no doubt that at least a dozen people on this forum would pay top dollar to see a video clip of the "happy dance."



        Boyce, see what you can do!!!

        Jim, Congrats to you!

        -Michael

        Comment


        • #5
          Hi Jim: CONGRATULATIONS on your good results. My husband Andy & I are fairly new here, but all the members have a great way of making us feel like part of the fold.

          On your questions...
          #1- The only cross-state comparison /chart I've come across about cancer was one published in the April 9th issue of Newsweek (the one with the LIVESTRONG wristband on the cover). It's not specific to testicular cancer though. I think we still have a copy of this issue and could scan the chart for you.

          #2- Andy recalls one of his oncologists saying that we need to keep an eye on high cholesterol and high blood pressure down the road, but this was not on the heels of any chemo, since chemo was not really an option for Andy. I'll have to clarify this with him at our next appointment.


          Originally posted by Bagpipe
          Conversely, maybe you just react and do what you need to do - naturally.
          #3- A few months ago - amid pathology reports, CT scans, brain MRI's, second opinions - a column came out in the L.A. Times during a most-appropriate time for us. The story was written by a young man who was diagnosed with cancer and wrote in amazement about his girlfriend of a relatively short period of time who saw him through his battle with his disease (he eventually married her), while he drew parallels to another guy whose lengthier relationship fell apart because it became too much for his girlfriend to handle. I think that it takes a very strong relationship to get through such unimaginable difficulties like cancer. Your priorities really change. I'm happy to hear stories like yours - how your wife displayed her finest quality during the worst of times. I'm not sure that the reaction is as natural for others. It's easy to be in-love when things are peachy, but true love sees you through when things are rotten! You're a lucky guy as I'm sure you already know.

          Best wishes and happy 4th!
          Maria
          *Hubby Andy diagnosed 02/13/07, Left IO 02/16/07 *Stage 1A Non-Seminoma (65% Immature Teratoma / 35% Embryonal Carcinoma) *RPLND 04/27/07 Lymph Nodes-ALL CLEAR
          *Complications from Chylous Ascites so Laparotomy 05/03/07 *No food for 10 weeks, TPN only *07/18/07 Removed drains, tubes, picc line *CT Scan 07/31/07-ALL CLEAR
          *CT Scan 02/12/08-ALL CLEAR *Hydrocele surgery 06/19/08 *CT Scan 9/30/08 and 03/06/09 shows <cm left lung nodule - under surveillance

          Comment


          • #6
            I don't recall seeing a comparison chart, but the data you'd need to create one is at this link.
            Scott, [email protected]
            right inguinal orchiectomy 6/5/2003 > nonseminoma, stage I > surveillance > L-RPLND 6/24/2005 for recurrence, suspected teratoma but found seminoma, stage II > chylous ascites until 9/2005 > surveillance and "all clear" since


            Your donation funds Livestrong services for people facing cancer now. Please sponsor my ride!

            Comment


            • #7
              Newsweek Chart

              April 9, 2007 Issue of Newsweek (Livestrong Wristband Cover)


              First, I'll cross my fingers and hope the attachment is actually attached to this reply!!! Here's the chart showing incidence and morbidity rates...I had to shrink the file so I hope it's clear enough to read. Scott, let me know if there's a better way to post this...I think the one I sent you might be a little more legible.
              Attached Files
              Maria
              *Hubby Andy diagnosed 02/13/07, Left IO 02/16/07 *Stage 1A Non-Seminoma (65% Immature Teratoma / 35% Embryonal Carcinoma) *RPLND 04/27/07 Lymph Nodes-ALL CLEAR
              *Complications from Chylous Ascites so Laparotomy 05/03/07 *No food for 10 weeks, TPN only *07/18/07 Removed drains, tubes, picc line *CT Scan 07/31/07-ALL CLEAR
              *CT Scan 02/12/08-ALL CLEAR *Hydrocele surgery 06/19/08 *CT Scan 9/30/08 and 03/06/09 shows <cm left lung nodule - under surveillance

              Comment

              Working...
              X