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  • TC in our Public Schools

    Today, after the Educational Support Meeting at Sloan, Bill and Nancy (Dadmo) took Danny and I out for lunch and I learned that Nancy is a P.E. teacher who actively teaches about TC detection in all of her classes. She should be commended and applauded for what she does, as I feel this is a vitally important part of what P.E. is is suppose to be about. The class is called "Physical Education" and implies that it is about more then just running laps and playing tether ball, football, softball and the rest. In my estimation, there are more valuable 'balls' to be learned about in our high schools and as far as I know, in most places, schools never mention a word about Testicular Cancer. Not in my school.

    There is a lack of education on this subject in high school, where I believe teenage men should be made aware of self-exams, TC symptoms and courses of action in P.E. class. Teaching the subject should be mandatory across the country, and I don't feel that way JUST because my brother is affected by it. If sexual education is taught in our schools, why not testicular cancer education? I don't see how we can expect young men, the very age group that is most susceptible to this disease, to be aware of the symptoms and courses of action if we do not educate them in our schools.

    This is a problem that needs to be fixed. I feel that if it is not addressed at a federal level (perhaps The Department of Health and Human Services) schools across the country will not adequately teach the subject and another generation of young men will be just as uneducated as the generation before. This is unacceptable. If we are to attempt to lower the statistics on advanced cases of TC and fatality rates, I don't see another way (barring a cure a for cancer) then early education. And I don't see another way then in our public schools.

    I am not advocating a scary class that makes nervous wrecks of kids who think they are going to get cancer. What I am advocating is a reasonable standardized curriculum in P.E. classes that address TC cancer and possibly others that effect young people and can be prevented with early detection.

    Is the LAF involved in anything that has to do with this cause?

    If not, they are going to hear from me. If not, maybe we need to start some kind of petition to get someones attention.

    Maybe the term 'early education' should be as widely quoted as 'early detection.' Perhaps the two used together and would yield positive results and save lives.

    Just my two cents,
    Michael

    PS Bill, Nancy, the fajita were fabulous.
    Last edited by dannysbrother; 07-11-07, 12:20 AM.

  • #2
    I agree, Michael. The Sean Kimerling Testicular Cancer Foundation, which is an inaugural member of the LIVESTRONG Young Adult Alliance, has supporting this idea as one of its main goals. They are producing a "program in a box" to present on testicular self-examination that will be available by this fall.

    I'll bet Stephen Carey would be thrilled to speak with you. They're close by you!

    29 Broadway, Suite 1412
    New York, NY 10006
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    Last edited by Scott; 07-11-07, 09:16 AM.
    Scott, [email protected]
    right inguinal orchiectomy 6/5/2003 > nonseminoma, stage I > surveillance > L-RPLND 6/24/2005 for recurrence, suspected teratoma but found seminoma, stage II > chylous ascites until 9/2005 > surveillance and "all clear" since


    Your donation funds Livestrong services for people facing cancer now. Please sponsor my ride!

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    • #3
      Michael,
      This is exactly the type of attitude we need to combat cancer before it strikes. Education is an integral part of prevention, and I do know for a fact that Scott, myself, and the other delegates for LIVESTRONG Day brought this to the attention of our respective elected officials on the Hill. A statistic quoted multiple times by the LAF is that with the knowledge available right now, you could easily prevent 1/3 of all cancer deaths. That's about 160,000 people a year. Clearly people need to be informed; after all, knowledge is power. Education of this sort needs to start when kids are young, and what Nancy has been doing is a prime example of how this should be done.
      I have been thinking about this issue especially because later this year, Congress will take up the re-authorization of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), with the effort being spear-headed by one of my elected officials, Senator Ted Kennedy, the chairman of the Senate Committed on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions. This would be a great place to incorporate legislation on health education. I have not looked at the renewal bill, and I'm not aware whether that has been released to the public, but I think this is a great chance to bring this issue to light. When I went to DC, I met with one of Senator Kennedy's aides from his committee. I'll write him to find out when this legislation is coming up for review.
      Michael, if you wish, we can speak more about this offline. Science, health, and education advocacy are my "moonlighting" profession .
      "Life moves pretty fast; if you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it." -Ferris Bueller
      11.22.06 -Dx the day before Thanksgiving
      12.09.06 -Rt I/O; 100% seminoma, multifocal; Stage I-A; Surveillance; Six years out! I consider myself cured.

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      • #4
        Stephen Carey (sean Kimmerling Foundation) is a great guy and VERY easy to talk to. He expressed a desire for all the TC groups to become more united in the cause and this is a fabulous way to start. If each of us took the program in a box to out school district to get this into the middle and high schools it would be amazing.
        Retired moderator. Husband, left I/O 16Dec2005, stage I seminoma with elevated b-HCG, no LVI, RTx15 (25Gy). All clear ever since.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by dannysbrother
          Just my two cents,
          Michael
          I'll see your two cents and raise you a dollar.

          When we unite behind a cause, we can move mountains.
          Scott, [email protected]
          right inguinal orchiectomy 6/5/2003 > nonseminoma, stage I > surveillance > L-RPLND 6/24/2005 for recurrence, suspected teratoma but found seminoma, stage II > chylous ascites until 9/2005 > surveillance and "all clear" since


          Your donation funds Livestrong services for people facing cancer now. Please sponsor my ride!

          Comment


          • #6
            Trying to fina an "in" myself

            I was thinking about the same topic and especially about the age group that needs the education.

            My plan is to talk to school athletic directors and administrators. Entering a PE class loaded with teenagers and asking a bunch of teenage boys to feel their nuggets while a bunch of teenage girls are in the room is a recipe for real discomfort. Maybe I can hook up with the sports coaches for boys teams abd get a few minutes before or after a practice.
            Stage III Non-Seminoma- 7/11/06
            Right I/O 7/12/06
            Completed 4x BEP 11/06
            Bi-Lateral RPLND (Dr. Shenifeld)- 11/27/06
            Surveillance since then

            When you think about it, what other choice is there but to hope? We have two options, medically and emotionally: give up, or Fight Like Hell.
            Lance Armstrong.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by boyce
              Entering a PE class loaded with teenagers and asking a bunch of teenage boys to feel their nuggets while a bunch of teenage girls are in the room is a recipe for real discomfort.
              Back when I was in junior high in Mexico, there was a day in which all of the girls in grades 6, 7, and 8 were excused from class to go to assembly. About an hour later, they all came back giggling. It turns out they took them out to discuss puberty and all that's associated with it. There was never such talk for the boys. I can see why there would be discomfort, but that's why PE would be a good setting so long as boys and girls are segregated for the purposes of this discussion.
              "Life moves pretty fast; if you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it." -Ferris Bueller
              11.22.06 -Dx the day before Thanksgiving
              12.09.06 -Rt I/O; 100% seminoma, multifocal; Stage I-A; Surveillance; Six years out! I consider myself cured.

              Comment


              • #8
                In my town and I assume in NJ, the puberty talks start earlier...good thing because at 6-7-8 grades girls have already started menstruating.

                In 4th grade the boys and girls are separated and each learn about their own changes. In 5th grade they separate again and learn about puberty for the opposite sex.
                Retired moderator. Husband, left I/O 16Dec2005, stage I seminoma with elevated b-HCG, no LVI, RTx15 (25Gy). All clear ever since.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Great topic and discussion. This is on my to do list to discuss with our school district in August. I know TC isn't talked about here, and would love to get it on the cirriculum. Thanks Scott for the link to Sean Kimmerling foundation.

                  If anyone has luck, information, or ideas on how to get this on the school cirriculum, I would love to hear about it.

                  Lori
                  Lori and Jon
                  Diagnosed 5/22/2006
                  I/O 5/26/2006, Stage 3, Good
                  Teratoma (Majority), Seminoma (10%), Yolk Sac
                  3xEP then determined not working
                  HDC w/stem cell transplant 8/16/06 to 9/25/06
                  Chest and Neck surgery 10/9/06 - immature teratoma
                  RPLND 11/16/06 - immature Teratoma
                  2/29/2008 - markers continue to be normal!
                  9/16/2008 - released from Dr. Einhorn's care

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                  • #10
                    I just called my Son to see if he could tell me what were the topics of his health and PE classes. As expected, TC was never covered and he's not so sure the girls had any education on breast exams either. I think he'll give one of his female buddies a call to find out more. Time to educate our educators!
                    I Love My Pack!

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Karen
                      In my town and I assume in NJ, the puberty talks start earlier...good thing because at 6-7-8 grades girls have already started menstruating.
                      As it should be... remember that my experience is from Mexico, where people are considerably more conservative and sheltered. Sex ed is, for the most part, taboo over there. I was even surprised it was discussed at all.
                      "Life moves pretty fast; if you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it." -Ferris Bueller
                      11.22.06 -Dx the day before Thanksgiving
                      12.09.06 -Rt I/O; 100% seminoma, multifocal; Stage I-A; Surveillance; Six years out! I consider myself cured.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Fed
                        later this year, Congress will take up the re-authorization of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), with the effort being spear-headed by one of my elected officials, Senator Ted Kennedy, the chairman of the Senate Committed on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions. This would be a great place to incorporate legislation on health education. I have not looked at the renewal bill, and I'm not aware whether that has been released to the public, but I think this is a great chance to bring this issue to light.
                        That's what I'm talking about! This seems like just the issue to be slipped into that or another bill in congress. A rare piece of 'pork' that will make an incredible impact if enforced and no doubt, save lives. Here's the thing Fed: The 'No Child Left Behind' act has MAJOR problems, mainly due to the fact, in my opinion that it does not address some of the major problems in our public schools and actually creates some new ones. Unless the renewal bill allows for a real overhaul of the program I don't think the bill itself is something that I would want to fight for. However, (and, sorry Scott, I don't what to get too political, but sometimes you can't help it when discussing these matters) with the Democrats in control of Congress right now, I do have hope that the bill will be looked at and reworked in a different way in which it was pushed through under Republican leadership and hopefully greatly improved upon. (that was pretty diplomatic I think) I am going to write a letter to Sen. Kennedy and copy it to my own elected officials from AZ and NY. Maybe some others. Maybe it will strike a chord somewhere.

                        For a quicky education of the NCLB Act, for those of you who'd like to know a little more, I recommend taking a look at TIME's cover story from several months ago. It is actually a pretty fair and balanced look at the programs' successes and failures thus far and gives a few ways in which it can be fixed.



                        Scott, I've browsed the Sean Kimerling site before but never noticed the 'Program in a Box' until today. I'm sure it does the job brilliantly. It sounds simple, inexpensive, easy and accessible. Every school in the country should have such a 'box.' With Federal mandate and funding I see that becoming a reality.

                        As for the failure of public schools in the area of Sex-Ed, I have to say, I'm 24 years old and I still don't know where babies come from! Can anyone help me??? (preferably the ladies on the board who aren't married and are looking to teach a youngster a few things.)

                        If only I'd been taught the right way... *sigh*



                        Michael

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                        • #13
                          Michael, if you do write a letter (with everything else on your plate) I would love to have a copy to send to my representatives...if you don't mind the plagiarism. I will also work to craft a letter, but I'm much better at talking!
                          Lori and Jon
                          Diagnosed 5/22/2006
                          I/O 5/26/2006, Stage 3, Good
                          Teratoma (Majority), Seminoma (10%), Yolk Sac
                          3xEP then determined not working
                          HDC w/stem cell transplant 8/16/06 to 9/25/06
                          Chest and Neck surgery 10/9/06 - immature teratoma
                          RPLND 11/16/06 - immature Teratoma
                          2/29/2008 - markers continue to be normal!
                          9/16/2008 - released from Dr. Einhorn's care

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I have mixed opinions on this, but I do think this should be done in Health Class and not in PE.

                            Kids in PE have a different mindset, than they would in a health class, they go to PE to goof off, joke around, have fun, and not to learn. This isn't a topic where people should goof off, they should pay attention.

                            We did have this topic covered in my high school during PE. They seperated the girls and boys, girls went to a breast exam class, boys had the TC class.

                            A brief talk was given by gym teacher, and then we watched a video of a guy giving himself a self-exam. Of course during this video, nobody watched, 100 jokes were made, and 0 people took it seriously. Then they passed around fake testicles (one fine, one with a lump) that we were supposed to feel. Again, only jokes.

                            I blame this partly on the fact that it took place in a gym, that was a place where you goof off, not a learning environment. I feel if it took place in a health class with the a health teacher, (with questions from the video appearing on an exam?) it would have been taken more seriously.

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                            • #15
                              Tough to say LB33, although you make some excellent points in your post...I think it is tough for any young boy to sit through watching a TC movie...even in health class... and not take it as a joke. I guess that is the nature of the age and how uncomfortable this topic can be for a lot of people. In the last year I have said the word testicle out loud more than I have in my other 33 years of life.

                              I think you take any man from this board, young, healthy looking, their life before them and stand them up in front of 100 High School students...and have him tell his story and you will have 100% full attention. A REAL person, telling a REAL story, by a guy who looks like them, with all the same dreams and future plans. They will be rocked by that...and they can ask questions, to a guy they can relate to. To let them know, this is no b*ll Sh*t, this is the real deal. That, in my opinion, is where the men on this forum can really make an impact. I look at the faces of Anthony, Brett, Fed, Joe, and Danny and picture them talking and there is no way to not have it taken seriously.

                              The second option that I think works is parents talking to their kids about it. Having a one on one conversation about the risks and how important it is to check yourself and come to them if anything that looks odd shows up. But it is a lot tougher to get to all the parents. But you can reach an army of young men and I bet the high schools would be happy to allow you to speak there.
                              Co-survivor with husband Boyce, Diagnosed 7-11-06, orchiectomy right testicle on 7-12-06- Stage 3A: Mixed germ cell tumor with inguinal seminomatous and kartotypic carcinoma. One tumor over 10 cm, second tumor 4 cm, Chemo 4xBEP: Bi-lateral RPLND Dec 2006, nerve sparing but left sterile.
                              Current DVT
                              Current testosterone replacement therapy, Testim.

                              "You must abandon the life you planned, to live the life that was meant for you" ~wisdom I have learned from my family on this forum

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