Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Have a Question about RPLND

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Have a Question about RPLND

    Howdy, First off glad to see a site dedicated to this. Going to have RPLND done may 30th. The doctor is telling me, they will preform a Bi-Latteral Incision. Which there are telling me they will have to cut a big piece of rib out as well. My questions here is has anyone here been through this type of operation, and how much different is recovery time etc.. ?

  • #2
    Howdy Mike,
    Welcome to the forums, unfortunately! Can you please share more information...your pathology, including % for each cell type if more than one, your stage, the state you live in and why the doctor chose this treatment. Have you gotten a second opinion or consulted with an expert on RPLND? Teh more you can tell us the better we can help.
    Retired moderator. Husband, left I/O 16Dec2005, stage I seminoma with elevated b-HCG, no LVI, RTx15 (25Gy). All clear ever since.

    Comment


    • #3
      Welcome, northportmike! That's the first time I've heard mention of removing part of a rib. Why is that?
      Scott
      right inguinal orchiectomy 6/5/2003 > nonseminoma, stage I > surveillance > L-RPLND 6/24/2005 for recurrence, suspected teratoma but found seminoma, stage II > chylous ascites until 9/2005 > surveillance and "all clear" since

      Your donation funds Livestrong services for people facing cancer now. Please sponsor my ride!

      Comment


      • #4
        I just searched the TC-NET archives and found a few older posts noting that Dr. Skinner at USC is one of few urologists who removes part of a rib during RPLND surgery. Where are you having yours?
        Scott
        right inguinal orchiectomy 6/5/2003 > nonseminoma, stage I > surveillance > L-RPLND 6/24/2005 for recurrence, suspected teratoma but found seminoma, stage II > chylous ascites until 9/2005 > surveillance and "all clear" since

        Your donation funds Livestrong services for people facing cancer now. Please sponsor my ride!

        Comment


        • #5
          northportmike:
          That certainly isn't the normal RPLND. Do you have any lung involvement? I have seen this done when the want to examine the lungs during the RPLND but it isn't standard. I would certainly make sure this is being done by an expert. Please get back to us on this.
          Son Jason diagnosed 4/30/04, stage III. Right I/O 4/30/04. Graduated College 5/13/04. 4XEP 6/7/04 - 8/13/04. Full open RPLND 10/13/04. All Clear since.

          Treated by Dr. Rakowski of Midland Park, NJ. Visited Sloan Kettering for protocol advice. RPLND done at Sloan Kettering.

          Comment


          • #6
            Hello Northportmike,

            I'm curious to this as well as I have an appointment with my urologist down at the Hospital at the University of Pennsylvania (HUP) on the 9th for the initial consultation. I'd say that my chances of having the surgery are very likely and I have not seen this being mentioned before anywhere. What did your doctor determine as the reasoning behind this decision? Please let me know and best of luck to you on the surgery and have a speedy recovery!!!
            4/11/06 Markers: AFP-41.0 & HCG-88
            4/13/06 Left I/O
            4/19/06 Diagnosed w/ nonseminoma;80% yolk sac, 15% teratoma, and 5% embryonal carcinoma
            5/10/06 Markers: AFP-4.7 & HCG-1
            5/12/06 RPLND surgery @ HUP
            6/19/06 Started 2 cycles of EP
            7/14/06 Completed 2 cycles of EP

            8/19/11 - Received what I call now my "five year-all clear"!!!
            8/20/11 - First Livestrong Challenge in Philly! http://www.tc-cancer.com/forum/images/smilies/cool.gif

            Comment


            • #7
              Rib Removal

              I myself am a patient of USC Norris center under the care of Dr. Stein, prodigy of Dr. Skinner. I had my RPLND done on Nov,22 of 05'. He did a Bi lateral dissection( removal of 92 nodes) and he had to remove a four inch section of my sixth rib. Reason is it gives them more room to work with and a clearer picture of all nodes to be removed.
              I could have never imagined the pain that was associated with it. Between the breathing tube for three days after (thanks to bleo), chest tube, and the resperatory therapist coming in every six hours to pound on my chest to break up mucous, I am not sure what is worse. It is by far more involved than a normal RPLND but very accurate. I am not trying to scare you out of the procedure, but prepare yourself for the worst. My total hospital stay was ten days. I still have occasional pain in my ribs from the surgery which can be normal up to two years. Hope this helps.... Have more info if you need.

              Comment


              • #8
                undefined
                Originally posted by northportmike
                Howdy, First off glad to see a site dedicated to this. Going to have RPLND done may 30th. The doctor is telling me, they will preform a Bi-Latteral Incision. Which there are telling me they will have to cut a big piece of rib out as well. My questions here is has anyone here been through this type of operation, and how much different is recovery time etc.. ?
                The RPLND isn't that bad. You go to sleep and then wake up what seems like 5 seconds later thinking "what the hell just happened". Here is a detailed description from my RPLND experience on 3/29/06. I hope it gives you some insight. You will do great! Good luck!
                • 3/29………RPLND I meet with Doctor Richard Foster early in March and he reiterates that there are false positives but that he is doubtful that is the case with mine because the tumors were so lit up. He explains that I am probably looking at 6 weeks of chemotherapy following the surgery and because of the location and size of the post chemo masses (9 x 7 cm, down from 12 x 12 centimeter pre chemo), that my left kidney is at risk as well. I do not eat anything after midnight the day before the surgery and report to the IU Med Center at 7:00 am for a 9:00 am surgery. The nurses, the anesthesiologist, the “extra student doctors” all pay me a visit prior to the long walk to the surgery room. I fall asleep and wake up in my room with that “what the hell just happened to me” thought going through my mind, but I am very comfortable. I am in a regular room and I have an IV in my neck that is delivering saline solution and morphine on demand and I have a catheter. That’s it, no gastronasal tube, no ICU, nothing like what RPLND patients used to go through. My wife tells me that the surgery went extremely well and that the kidney was saved! It is W evening and I can have nothing to eat except ice chips. I am up walking the corridor in the wee morning hours on TH and am encouraged to keep moving as they want you to have a BM sooner rather than later. On Thursday I can only have water to drink and I make two or three transits up and down the corridor during the day. Doctor Foster pays a visit to tell me he has “good news and bad news”. The good news is that the biopsy shows my tumors were made up of entirely necrotic tissue and the bad news is that I probably would have been fine without the surgery. Nonetheless, I am glad to have this bastard out of my abdomen and not have to wonder what is going on back there. I am finally served some crackers and chicken noodle soup for dinner on Thursday night. The nurse comes in about 7:00 p.m. and detaches me from the neck IV and I switch to oral pain medicine. I did experience some pretty stout abdominal pain, but only when I sat up to get out of bed and when I tried to stand up straight. I had very little pain when lying still. Early Friday morning I had my catheter removed and the nurse put a suppository in to trigger a BM. I was visited by several student doctors, one of which asked me if I wanted to go home Friday afternoon. It has not been too long since this surgery required bowel flushing the night before the surgery, and the patient could anticipate waking up in ICU with various wires and tubes followed by a lengthy hospital stay of 5 to 10 days. My total time at the hospital was 56 hours and I am planning on returning to work full time on April 17th, just 19 days following surgery. I believe I am cancer free and hope to stay that way. It has been a long 8 months, but I feel like I have just won a lottery. Good luck.
                Brian, [email protected]
                left inguinal orchiectomy 9/21/2005 > seminoma, stage IIC 12cm x 12cm retroperitoneal mass> 3XBEP completed 11/30/2005 > residual 9cm x 7cm mass removed 3/29/06. All necrotic tissue found > Surveillance

                Comment


                • #9
                  Welcome to the forums, indiana9! It's good to see you jump right in!
                  Scott
                  right inguinal orchiectomy 6/5/2003 > nonseminoma, stage I > surveillance > L-RPLND 6/24/2005 for recurrence, suspected teratoma but found seminoma, stage II > chylous ascites until 9/2005 > surveillance and "all clear" since

                  Your donation funds Livestrong services for people facing cancer now. Please sponsor my ride!

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X